Sateca'an

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ca ke kíwedna, kawen uín konis díipa.
Lit. You (may) not understand me, but go in good health.

Phonemes, Phonetics, and Orthography

Written a b c d e g h í i k l m n o p
Romanized a b c d e g h í i k l m n o p
IPA a b ʃ d e g h i ɪ k l m n o p

Written r s t u w n/a
Romanized r s t u w '
IPA ɹ, r* s t u w ʔ

*dependent on dialect

Syllable structure: (C1)(C2)V(i)(C3)

C1: Any consonant
C2: /w/, /l/, rarely /s/ or /r/
V:   Any vowel
C3: /n/, /l/, /c/, less often /h/, /s/, /k/, /t/ or /d/.

The phoneme /ʔ/ is not considered a letter or sound alone, but rather, is used to separate repeated vowels. It is not technically represented in Sateca'an's native script, but is inserted here in transliteration for convenience and as a stylistic choice.

A word-final /h/ is not generally pronounced.

Vocabulary

Pronouns

ca
I
ke
you
ím
it/he/she
ima
this (nearer to speaker)
mat
that (further from speaker)

din
where
mea
what
mecun
when

Articles

na
the

Nouns

Neuter
ana
soup, stew
acwin
bowl, shell
dwedon
coast, shore
dwemín
water
dweo
lake, river, a large body of water as seen from shore
enwa
feather, quill
ídan
west
íde
sun
ísí
tree
íwa
thing
kamwe
beast, wild animal
mwat
front, top, end
nwa
word
nea
bird, flying animal
ríne
east
síndwe
ocean, sea, a body of water as seen from within it

Feminine
acinde
boat (generic)
acintícin
boat, canoe (from acinde tí cin, "boat of one")
acintíroc
boat (acinde tí rocí, "boat of twenty men")
acla
back, bottom (of something), beginning
ahlamín
air, cloud
ahlan
sky
crun
time (general)
coirí
time (a specific point or moment)
hle
child
hwakan
animal (domestic)
kahla
wind
koitla
cloak, garment
kse
meat
ku
plant
míta
fire
molka
bush, branch
talta
mother
telu
woman
telte
peace
tenlatla
dagger (from diminutive of /ten/, "sword")

Masculine
cuíl
south
cun
north
dama
cloth
hlelí
son, boy
lata
father
man
kimwí
(curved) sword (loanword)
konis
health
mon
edge, border
nat
root
orun
light
sa
tongue, language
se
body
si
rock, stone
sín
earth, land
símwín
soil
tagan
foot, leg
ten
sword

Prepositions

uín
with, by means of
na
in, at, on, near
mwatel
above, in front of, after
actel
behind, in back of, before

Verbs

a
to be (in a temporary state)
an
to walk
casí
to create, to give birth to
cíwa
to love, to be fond of
cila
to intend, to plan (to)
ec
to speak with
el
to do
enwula
to write (enwa ula, "to use a quill")
íhwe
to go (somewhere in particular)*
íhwena
to visit (from "íhwe ina", to go and come from)
ílí
to see or hear
ílisa
to return (to somewhere in particular)
ina
to come from (somewhere), to be originally from (somewhere)*
iníl
to trouble, to disturb
ipa
to travel/go/come (from somewhere, to somewhere)*
laíle
to carry
milwa
to arrive, to make an appearance, to reach
nohle
to wear
oel
to not have
omlín
to argue, to disagree
osa
to want
run
to eat or drink
si
to be (permanently, or possessing an inherent quality)
ula
to use
usla
to resemble, to be like
wía
to examine, to learn about
wedna
to know (from "wadan", to have learned of)
wo
to exist

*The distinction between these words is not the movement relative to the speaker, but in specifying point of origin versus point of destination or both. The verb "íhwe" specifies a destination, "ina" specifies a point of origin, and "ipa" can have both.

Adjectives

akras
strong
dola
empty
hlu
large
ikor
more
ínak
small
íwu
old
ken
full
nai
less
olal
weak
slí
all, completely ("none" with negative)
tusa
new

címín
white, yellow
eda
red, orange
leo
green
malin
blue
somír
black, purple, dark

Greetings, Niceties, etc.

uín telte ca'an dí'íhwe?
Do you come to us in peace? (Common greeting)
uín telte ke'an díipa
We travel to you in peace (reply to above)
uín konis dí'ílisaga
Return (home) in health (common farewell)
kíoelas
thank you (from kíoelelas, "(I am) not lacking")
ínilkícila
please (lit. "(I) don't intend to bother (you)")

Conjuctions

wa
and (used for both lists and clauses)
kawen
but, however
til
or

Numbers

cin
1
dan
2
pen
3
taga
4
ceo
5
sun
6
pa
7
olen
8
sea
9
ro
10
ro wa cin
11
ro wa ceo
15
roan dan
20 (not the only form, see grammar notes)
roan dan wa cin
21
roan pen
30
roan taga
40
wila
100
wila wa cin
101
wila wa roan dan
120
wila'an dan
200

Grammar

Word order is typically SOV. Adjectives follow nouns.

Plurals, Possessives, and Other Affixes

Plural suffixes conjugate by gender.

Neuter -an
Feminine -ke
Masculine -cí

Possessives precede nouns, and conjugate by animacy of the possessor.

Animate
Inanimate ta

Examples:

dweo ta na ídan
river of the west

ten tí talta tí ca
my mother's sword

Counting

Numbers use neutral conjugation by default (ex. /roan dan/, "two tens", for 20), but when used to describe a number of something, they use the plural conjugation appropriate to the noun being counted. Note that the noun is not pluralized when a number is given.

rocí dan wa taga bíwo
rocí dan wa taga bíwo
There are twenty-four (lit. "two tens and four") men.

ca ísí wila wa roan ceo díílídan
ca ísí wila wa roan ceo dí'ílídan
I saw one hundred and fifty trees.

ca hle roke pen wa sea kíwo.
ca hle roke pen wa sea kíwo.
I do not have thirty-nine children.

Verb Conjugation

Verbs take different prefixes depending on gender and animacy of the subject.

Neuter Feminine Masculine Negative*
Animate
Inanimate de amam ka

*Applies regardless of gender

Tense is determined by a verb-ending suffix.

Simple Continuous Conditional
Past -(e)dan -(e)dos -(e)din
Present n/a -(e)las -(e)lín
Future -(e)kan -(e)kos -(e)kín

Perfect and pluperfect forms are made by adding ogín (animate) or egan (inanimate) as suffixes to the simple and continuous forms, respectively. The suffix ga marks imperatives.

Variant and Irregular Verbs

There are categories of verbs that conjugate a little differently than the rest.

To Be

/dea/ becomes /de/, and /kaa/ becomes /ka/.

na dweo ínak de.
The lake is small.

hle íwu ka.
(A) child is not old.

Verbs beginning in /w/

The beginnings /dew/ and /kaw/ become /dw/ and /kw/.

dwemín dwo.
There is water.

dwemín kwo.
There is no water.

Verbs beginning in /ɪ/

The beginnings /diɪ/, /biɪ/, and /kiɪ/ become /diʔ/, /biʔ/, and /kiʔ/. In especially casual speech, the /ʔ/ may also be omitted entirely. (The spelling does not change.)

ca dwedon ta na cun díina.
ʃa dwedon ta na ʃun diʔna
I come from the Northern coast.

kíinílga ca.
kiʔnilga ʃa
Don't bother me.

Conditional Form

The conditional form is a little unusual, but basically is used for "if" statements, to express the possibility of something.

For example:

telu talta dísilín, hle díwo til dícasídan.
telu talta dísilín, hle díwo til dícasídan.
If (a) woman is a mother, (either) (she) has a child, or bore one.

ca na ana dírundín, na acwin dola de.
ca na ana dírundín, na acwin dola de.
If I ate the soup, the bowl is empty.

ca lata tí ke kísilín, ke hlelí tí ca kísi.
ca lata tí ke kísilín, ke hlelí tí ca kísi.
If I am not your father, you are not my son.

Adjective Conjugation

Adjectives, when applied to nouns, conjugate with a suffix based on the noun's gender.

Neuter-du
Feminine-mar
Masculine-nu
Negative ("un-")-kla

na kahla cunmar
na kahla cunmar
The North wind

These suffixes can also convert a noun or (appropriately conjugated) verb into an adjective.

na lí aclanu
na lí aclanu
the first man

ísían molkake deusladu
ísían molkake deusladu
trees that look like bushes

Gerunds, Derivation, etc.

tba

Possession

There are two common verbs to describe possession.

The verb /wo/ actually means "to exist", but if used transitively, indicates possession of the object. This is more commonly used for general cases.

The verb /oel/ means "to not have", and is perhaps better translated as "to lack". To say you have something uses the negative, /kíoel/. This verb usually implies not just having a thing, but having enough of a thing, or the thing being useful or sufficient for the possessor.


Translations

tba


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